The Latest Trends Around Sleep Specialists


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Be sure that there are no blankets, pillows, stuffed toys, or bumper pads around your baby, so that your baby does not roll into any of those items, which could block airflow. Your baby needs to be able to fall asleep without you there, so try to avoid rocking/feeding to sleep/holding your hand a habit (although obviously don’t worry about doing it sometimes if your baby is upset or ill). Tuck your baby up, say goodnight, and leave. If baby doesn't settle, wait a bit (in case they do!) then go in and pat them/shush them/stroke their face, to reassure them and see if that helps them to settle to sleep. Keep doing it as long as they need you: be boring and quiet, don’t engage. Try to extend the gap between visits. It can take a few – very long! – nights but sleep experts say you’ll see results in 3-4 days maximum. Fresh air is good for us - everyone knows that. And it’s good for baby too. Nothing like getting them out for a brisk walk, even if it’s not the height of summer you can wrap them up and just go. And many people say that their baby sleeps better -and for longer - after a nap in the fresh air. Try to resist the urge to rush in if your baby murmurs in the night. Depending on their age, you could leave them for a few minutes and see if they settle on their own. Having said that, newborn babies invariably wake up repeatedly in the night for the first few months and disturbed nights can be very hard to cope with. It is normal for babies to wake during the night. Some babies sleep much more than others. Some sleep for long periods, others in short bursts. Some soon sleep through the night, some don't for a long time. Your baby will have their own pattern of waking and sleeping, and it's unlikely to be the same as other babies you know. Remember, babies should be sleeping in the same room as an adult until six months, to reduce the risk of SIDS.

Sleep Specialists

Naturally, since your baby wakes frequently in the first two months, so will you. And that’s a problem because when you wake frequently, you end up getting twice as much light sleep and just half as much deep, restorative sleep. That’s why you may still feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning. (This can be especially tough if you slept poorly the last months of pregnancy or are recovering from a C-section.) Your baby will soon start to go down for longer stretches and eventually through the night, and you will get your sleep back again. Babies may find it hard to adjust from a sleeping position they have been used to, so persevere and do speak to your paediatrician if you are concerned. Front-sleeping should only be continued for on-going medical reasons on the advice of your paediatrician. Use opaque shades to block out the light, which may get you an extra hour of sleep if you have one of those little roosters who awakens to the first ray of sunlight entering the bedroom. A sleep consultant will take a holistic approach to create a sleeping system that you can manage and one which takes into account sleep training as well as the needs of the baby and considerations of each family member.

Keep Nighttime Care Low-key

During the first year of your baby’s life, the proportion of night-time sleep gradually increases and the number of daytime naps decreases as your little one gets older. Babies do best with special rumbling white noise. That’s what mimics the womb the best. The right type of white noise—for all naps and nights—is key to better sleep from day one to the first birthday and well beyond! Avoid scheduling errands when it's baby's naptime. If your cutie does fall asleep in the stroller, car seat or swing, be sure to transfer him to the crib as soon as possible. Babies thrive on routines, so create a simple, calming, bedtime routine that will serve as a cue to sleep. Swaddling baby (until he's around 8 weeks old) or putting him into a sleep sack before placing him in the crib may make him feel extra secure and, hopefully, encourage him to fall asleep in his bed. For gentle sleep training guidance it may be useful to enlist the services of a sleep consultant.

Over the coming weeks and months, you’re going to gently teach your baby he is loved. You can start right away by using the best cues that help him drift off to sleep and give him the confidence to slumber securely and fall back to sleep when he wakens. However, you’ll do it in easy baby steps, so his faith in you grows and grows. Bedtime routines reinforce babies' natural circadian rhythms, helping teach them the difference between day and night. Later on, a baby bedtime routine helps little ones to slow down and prepare mentally for bedtime. At 3 to 6 months old your baby needs fewer night feeds and will be able to sleep for longer, with most babies sleeping between 12 and 14 hours across the day and night. For decades, grandmas—and doctors—taught that feeding babies a spoon or two of cereal would fill their stomach and keep them sleeping all night. But several studies show that bedtime cereal does nothing to promote sleep. If your baby is cranky at night, chances are something's bothering her. Try a quick comfort check before putting her down: Is her belly full, is her diaper changed and is she wearing a super-soft, tag-free sleeper? Review her sleep environment as well. Make sure the TV is off, limit interactions and be as quiet as you can around the crib. If you do need to feed or change her, keep it low-key. Speak in a quiet, calming voice and avoid doing anything that might stimulate her. If you're looking for a compassionate, effective and evidence-based approach to sleep or just advice on one thing like ferber method then a baby sleep specialist will be able to help you.

The Early Days

It's a common misconception that hanging mobiles featuring soothing colours, music and even lights can help a new baby nod off to sleep when placed above their cot. However, mobiles and night projectors can actually have the opposite effect of over stimulating your baby so that your baby is no longer sleepy enough to fall asleep on his own. If your baby sleeps often and seems happy most of the time, you don’t need to keep track of how many hours he’s slept. I only recommend you track your baby’s sleep if you think there’s a problem- for example, if baby is continually fussy or awake for long periods day and night. Make bedtime the same time each day to regulate your child’s body clock. A bedtime routine is a powerful cue leading up to sleeptime and should take place in the room in which your baby sleeps. It should be simple, comforting and predictable with calming and quiet activities, such as lullabies and simple rhyming stories, all of which will help your baby to wind down before going to sleep. Newborns need to feed around the clock and then gradually start to eat the bulk of their meals during the daytime. Still, for some babies, waking for a nighttime feeding can be a tough habit to break. Babies as young as 4 months old can go all night without feeding. Take lots of daytime walks to get extra sunlight exposure. (Indirect light is best in the summertime, to avoid sunburns.) If it’s too cold to go out, get lots of light exposure at home, especially during the early morning, to help set your baby’s circadian clock. Whether its something specific like 4 month sleep regression or really anything baby sleep related, a baby sleep consultant can guide you to find a sleep solution as individual as your baby is.

If your baby falls asleep on you, wait 10-15 minutes until they are in a deeper sleep before lowering them into their cot. If your baby has only just fallen asleep, then they are likely to wake when you move them. Your newborn will spend the majority of time sleeping, and the rest of their time eating - this is especially true for the first few weeks. As a 6-week-old baby, your newborn will sleep up to 18 hours for every 24 hour period - in their first few days of being alive, they'll sleep even more! Of course, as your baby grows they'll need less and less sleep each day. If your baby isn’t sleeping because she’s sick, know the signs it’s time to call her pediatrician, most commonly including fever (101 Fahrenheit or higher if your baby is 6 months or older), bloody nasal discharge, swollen glands or an earache (babies may pull at their ears). If baby starts to cry overnight, hold off for a few minutes before entering her room — she may fall back to sleep by herself. When you do go in, offer some quick comfort with a pat on the head or a tummy rub, but don’t linger or pick her up, as she may come to expect it every time. For months, you’ve likely woken up several times a night to feed your little one. Night weaning is making sure your baby is eating their meals during the day, so that they don’t have to wake up to eat in the middle of the night anymore. If you need guidance on sleep regression then let a sleep consultant support you in unlocking your child's potential, with their gentle, empathetic approach to sleep.

Let Your Baby Be Your Guide

Other than having some free time in the evening, there is another great advantage with having your child falling asleep in his bed – he will not become terrified waking up in the middle of the night! If your baby always falls asleep in your arms, he will start believing that this is his bed, everything else must be terribly wrong. It is normal for parents to be up 2-3 times or sometimes even more times during the night for the first 6 months. Your baby will get hungry, they may need changing or could be too hot or cold which may cause them to wake up. By the time your baby is 6 months, they might be capable of sleeping through the night. It is never too early to introduce bedtime rituals. This involves doing the same things in the same order every night, for example washing your baby, dressing them, a song or story and a cuddle. You can get more details regarding Sleep Specialists at this NHS link.

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